My 11 month male rottie Barron is having hip replacement surgery - what do I need for his recovery?

by Bonnie Hornick
(Reisterstown Md)

Hi
My name is Bonnie and my rottie is Barron 11 months old. Can anyone help me with suggestion on his recovery ahead of time I know he will need complete rest for several months. I do have an extra large crate I'm getting him used to now.

I have a ramp for my few steps to get him out side for potty breaks What else do I need I'm sure the specialist will give me great direction for his recovery but would like to make sure I have all that I need.


Follow Barron the Rottweilers progress as he has surgery for his hip dysplasia and recuperates at home...

Barron and his hip replacement

Barron's progress after hip surgery

Barron's progress after hip dysplasia surgery Part 2

Update on Barron's hip replacement

October 2012 Update

Happy Barron with his new hip - March 2013!


Comments for My 11 month male rottie Barron is having hip replacement surgery - what do I need for his recovery?

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Jun 01, 2016
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Ortocanis hip brace for hip dysplasia NEW
by: Karl

For anyone in the same position as me with a dog that has hip dysplasia, one of the best things i've found to help the discomfort was getting her a dog hip brace by Ortocanis. My dog's dysplasia is mild, and she's still on the younger side, but this brace does a great job of easing her discomfort on days when I can tell that she's uncomfortable. This is where I found it online - http://www.ortocanis.com/en/technical-helps-for-dogs/128-hip-and-back-brace.html. Not a 24/7 remedy but definitely something that can make a big difference in your dog's quality of life.

May 24, 2012
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Barron up date NEW
by: Bonnie

Just got off the phone with the surgeon Barron is dueing great and is coming home today very excited but also very nervous Will keep everyone updated on his progress Thanks Bonnie

May 22, 2012
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Barron"s up date NEW
by: Bonnie

Just got a call from the surgeon, Barron is out of surgery everything went great he now has a new right hip Will get another up date at 4:30 when he's out of recovery and awake Will keeep everyone posted on how he's doing

Bonnie

May 13, 2012
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Barron NEW
by: Marlee

Hi, my dog had CCL surgery last summer. It was very difficult for both of us, but your dog is lucky to have such a devoted owner. You may have times, like I did, when you question whether you did the right thing by putting your dog thru this, but follow your vet's advice, keep him quiet, and things will be fine. My dog is doing great now, and I'm sure yours will too,good luck with everything!

May 12, 2012
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Barrons surgery NEW
by: Bonnie and Barron

Thanks for your comments on Barrons surgery I bought a sling for under his tummy to help lift him (I am a small person)I have cover all slippery surfaces in my home because he was having a hard time getting up from my kitchen and bathroom floor I guess thats it for now but I will keep everyone posted on his recovery
Thanks again Christopher

May 12, 2012
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Barrons surgery NEW
by: Bonnie and Barron

Thanks for your comments on Barrons surgery I bought a sling for under his tummy to help lift him (I am a small person)I have cover all slippery surfaces in my home because he was having a hard time getting up from my kitchen and bathroom floor I guess thats it for now but I will keep everyone posted on his recovery
Thanks again Christopher

May 12, 2012
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What to expect NEW
by: Christopher Bayhi

Follow the advice of your vet and surgeon 100%.

A Rottie will usually need a minimum of 2 months to recover from hip replacement surgery to make sure the hip socket bonds properly to the pelvis. During this period the joint is still bonding and new bone is being laid down. Therefore your need to limit his activity to “gentle use” only. This is usually what to expect.

You need a small area and pen to confine the dog, in even when you are home with him. You can keep your boy in a place away from lots of activity, but he should be able to see you so he won’t feel isolated. Visit him often to let him know you haven’t forgotten about him.

He should not be allowed to jump, run, or be allowed in an area where he may slip and damage the implant such as a tile, linoleum, or wood floor. If he does slip, even a little bit, it puts considerable lateral strain on the hips and he may injure himself. If this happens he’s not just going to whimper like he got a vaccination. He’s going to let out a yelp or howl that will haunt your dreams. If this happens he needs to be taken immediately to your vet for x-rays to make sure the joint is still intact and there was no damage done.

Use a sturdy towel or folded bed sheet to put under his belly to help lift him up the first few days. This will help him steady himself when he gets up to go potty. And give him numerous opportunities to go potty. Gradually he will be able to take longer and longer leash walks when the doctor says it’s ok to start. Usually at about 5 to 8 weeks post surgery. This allows the hip, muscles, tendons and other surrounding tissue to strengthen.

You should have a dedicated anal thermometer just for Barron to take his temperature to make sure he doesn’t develop an infection. Administer pain and other medications on time every time. You will have at least one and probably more follow up appointments so the vet or surgeon can check on the progress of the replacement. If you have ANY doubts or worries, contact the appropriate person immediately and let them know. It’s unusual, but sometimes a simple thing like bruising or oozing from the surgical site can mean there’s a big problem. So if you see something that worries you call them! That’s what they get paid for.

Some vets recommend a 1–2 day post-operative stay in the hospital for observation after the replacement. Others recommend as many as 4–7 days depending on the severity of the replacement. Some vets suggest that after 5 weeks, progressively increasing the dogs activity to a normal level can be resumed. Others say it's unsafe until after 8 weeks. You know your dog best. Caution on your part will do absolutely no harm. After all, who knows Barron best? Again, ALWAYS consult your vet or the surgeon if you have any questions.

Good luck to you and Barron! Please keep us updated and we’re keeping ya’ll in our prayers!

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